OCT

We are eager to announce the delivery of the Optical Coherence Tomography (Cirrus HD-OCT).

What is Cirrus HD-OCT?

Cirrus HD-OCT is the newest high definition retinal OCT system.  This cutting edge diagnostic system acquires many high resolution scans that allow our doctor to get a 3D image of your retina.  The technology is much like ultrasound, except that is uses light rather than sound.  Optical Coherence Tomography is almost like taking biopsies without surgery. The procedure is non-contact and non-invasive.

The Cirrus OCT scans an infrared light across the retina, which generates a cross-sectional image of the tissue in microscopic detail. It generates a measurement of tissue and distance of up to 5/1000 of a millimeter and over 67,000,000 data points. This allows us to view your retina as if it were under a microscope, enhancing our ability to diagnose and manage a wide-range of retinal disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, ocular histoplasmosis, central serous retinopathy, macular pucker and macular holes.

Diabetes

Our Optometrist is experienced in the management of diabetic eye disease. Our diabetic patients have their retinas routinely photographed.

The most visually disabling consequence of diabetic retinopathy is diabetic macular edema, which is very difficult to detect with conventional means used in routine ophthalmic practice. The Cirrus OCT technology is used to detect the most subtle macular changes in diabetes and hypertension.

We recommend that all patients suffering from diabetic or hypertensive retinopathy undergo Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) of the macula.

Macular Degeneration

The macula is the tiny area of the retina that is very sensitive to color and detail. For example, we use our macula when we look at the finest print. The rest of the retina is more sensitive to movement and provides us with our night vision.

There are many types of macular degeneration but by far the most common is Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). We all get this to some extent as we get older. But of course AMD affects some people earlier in life more than others.

There are two main types of AMD, wet and dry. Wet AMD can be helped if caught early enough. This is one of the reasons why your eye care practitioner advises regular checks after the age of 60 years, usually annually. You should also always seek advice if you see a sudden deterioration in you vision, such as a straight line appearing wavy.

Dry AMD is more difficult to treat but is generally less damaging to sight. It is also more common.

One of the most effective ways to detect subtle macular changes, and differentiate the plethora of different types of macular pathology is by utilizing the new technology of spectral domain optical coherence tomography Cirrus HD-OCT.

We therefore recommend that anyone with early macular degeneration have a regular eye examination including Cirrus OCT. The Cirrus OCT also assists us to differentially diagnose conditions such as macular hole, pseudo-hole, lamellar hole, macular pucker (cellophane maculopathy) and vitreo-retinal traction, to name just a few.

We are often able to help patients with AMD see better with a range of Low Vision Aids. We are also able to offer general advice on diet, vitamin supplementation and general health as it relates to reduce the aging process in the eye. We are happy to dispense home Amsler Grid tests for daily self monitoring to catch Wet AMD at its earliest point.

Use this form to learn more about our services..

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

8:00 am - 12:00 pm

1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 12:00 pm

1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 12:00 pm

1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 12:00 pm

1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 12:00 pm

1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Closed

Location

Find us on the map

Testimonial

Reviews From Our Satisfied Patients

  • "Family Eye Care is the best at what they do and makes you feel right at home."
    John D. Childress, TX

Featured Articles

Read up on informative topics

  • Nystagmus

    Nystagmus is a vision condition characterized by repetitive, uncontrolled eye movements. These involuntary eye movements may be side-to-side, up and down, or in a circular pattern, which hinders the eyes’ ability to focus on a steady object. Individuals with nystagmus may hold their heads in unusual ...

    Read More
  • Macular Hole

    The condition known as a macular hole refers to a tiny break in the macula that results in blurry or distorted vision. To fully understand the condition, one must understand eye anatomy. The macula is a spot located in the center of the retina (the back portion of the eye). Located where light comes ...

    Read More
  • How It Helps

    The goal of vision therapy is to treat vision problems that cannot be fully addressed through eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery. For example, studies show that vision therapy may be beneficial for addressing eyestrain and other issues that can affect a child’s reading abilities. The human brain ...

    Read More
  • How It Works

    Vision therapy, also referred to as vision training, neuro-vision therapy, or vision rehabilitation, is an optometry subspecialty. Vision therapy is prescribed to develop, improve and/or enhance visual function so an individual’s vision system functions more smoothly. Vision therapy can be beneficial ...

    Read More
  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    One of the leading causes of vision loss in people who are age 50 or older is age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This common eye condition leads to damage of a small spot near the center of the retina called the macula. The macula provides us with the ability to clearly see objects that are straight ...

    Read More
  • Signs and Symptoms Checklist

    Vision therapy, which is also known as vision training or visual training, is an individualized treatment program that can help identify and correct perceptual-cognitive deficiencies that are impacting visual learning, focus, and concentration. Vision Therapy for Children: Checklist While individuals ...

    Read More
  • Pediatric Ophthlamology

    Ophthalmology addresses the physiology, anatomy and diseases of the eyes. Pediatric ophthalmology focuses on the eyes of children. Pediatric ophthalmologists examine children’s eyes to see if they need corrective lenses or other treatments to improve their vision. Training for Pediatric Ophthalmologists Pediatric ...

    Read More
  • Presbyopia

    Somewhere around the age of 40, most people’s eyes lose the ability to focus on close-up objects. This condition is called presbyopia. You may start holding reading material farther away, because it is blurry up close. Reading suddenly gives you eyestrain. You might wonder when manufacturers started ...

    Read More
  • Myopia

    Myopia, or nearsightedness, means that your eyes can see close objects clearly but struggle to see things in the distance. Nearly 30 percent of Americans are nearsighted. This condition usually develops in children and teenagers, up to about the age of 20. A teacher or parent might notice a child squinting ...

    Read More
  • Diabetic Eye Diseases

    Diabetes is a condition that involves high blood sugar (glucose) levels. This can affect many parts of the body, including the eyes. One of the most common diabetic eye diseases is diabetic retinopathy, which is also a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy ...

    Read More

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up for more articles